Love for books

Feb 11

Love for books, originally uploaded by birdyonmywindow. “Books are becoming everything to me. If I had at this moment any choice in life, I would bury myself in one of those immense libraries…and never pass a waking hour without a book before me.” ~ Thomas B. Macaulay I took this photograph and edited with Photoshop. Nice, eh? =) If you want it as a screensaver just click on the link and it’ll take you to the bigger size on...

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Book of Christmas Love

Dec 17

4/365. Book of Love., originally uploaded by Thomas Åsen. What better present than a book for the holidays? Another stunning bibliophotograph worth...

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Nicole Krauss on Books

Oct 30

There are some authors who entrance me, wordsmiths capable of pulling just the right string at just the right time—capable of putting into words a messy feeling or a moment so complex I would otherwise remain speechless for days. These authors bring characters alive and instill in you messages of effervescent hope, gut-wrenching sadness—teaching you lessons you will never forget or maybe revisiting ones you seem unable to grasp. Authors like these grip me right in the chest on the very first page and keep me tied to their books from beginning to end, urging me to dog ear page after page just to reread and reread quotes I can feel in the very cortex of my being. Such authors are few and far between but once such author for me is Nicole Krauss. She is the author of The History of Love and her recently released 2nd novel, Great House, which I pre-ordered and am now savoring every line, every worded moment within. In Nicole Krauss’ latest novel, Great House, she writes about books and I really want to share this with you. I’ve always liked the feeling of traveling light; there is something in me that wants to feel I could leave wherever I am, at any time, without effort. The idea of being weighed down made me uneasy, as if I lived on the surface of a frozen lake and each new trapping of domestic life—a pot, a chair, a lamp—threatened to be the thing that sent me through the ice. The only exception was books, which I acquired freely, because I never really felt they belonged to me. Because of this, I never felt compelled to finish those I didn’t like, or even pressure to like them at all. When at last I came across the right book the feeling was violent: it blew open a hole in me that made my life more dangerous because I couldn’t control what came through it. [Reading], the thing that had been at the center of my life for as long as I could remember, and which in the past had formed a bulwark against...

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Bellingham reads in style…

Jul 09

Someone wanted to visit a friend, said friend lives in a town moderately far away… so off we went on a grand adventure to Bellingham, WA. We took the scenic route on the Chuckanut Drive (route 11) because it made for a prettier getaway and mapquest said it wouldn’t take much more time than taking ol’ reliable but boring I5. It was an amazing drive. Two lane road winding around a very rocky cliff warning of slides and falling rocks. Water…the San Juans…rocky edges so close I could have reached out and touched them. It was a nice drive despite the rider’s sunburn I am now nursing. This scenic drive led us right into Fairhaven, a suburb of Bellingham. It is a quaint lovely nature loving, recycling-is-a-top-priority-here kind of place. There were so few major chains of anything there that we didn’t even discover the Starbucks till well into the evening. They had their local banks and their local grocery stores and more than one co-op food group! How absolutely greenalicious is that? The sidewalks were littered with quirky red benched bus stops, red and white fire hydrants and blue recycle containers filled to their brims with plastic and glass eco-responsibility. I looked for its Barnes and Noble, a stop I search for in every place I travel. I didn’t find one but what I did find was even better… two independent books stores on the same road… one multi-level store peopled like one rarely sees in an independent book store anymore or any place dealing with enrichment of the mind. The one I am referring to is “Village Books” which is larger than life, bigger (and better) than Barnes and Noble or Amazon.com and Borders (by far!). It has so much muchliness it pours out onto the court-yard where people linger all day just to ingest a little (or a lot) before they go forward on their merry ways or they stop after a long day of work for respite that is all too elusive in our fast-paced gotta-go, gotta-produce society. Sprinkled out like crumbs for the hansel and gretels of Bellingham were quotes on the outside of the store enticing people inside to relish or discover or rediscover the beauty of...

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