Eep!

Mar 08

Eep!

      Eep! by Joke van Leeuwen is really one of the best children’s books I’ve read in a long time. It started out with 3 words that just grabbed me, Warren likes birds. He is married to Tina. They seem to live a rather ordinary life, filled with repetition, doing the same old-same old, like most of us. We get into our habits, our comfortable routines. They have as well. Until one day Warren sees a new kind of baby bird, a part human bird. He brings her home and it is love at first site—they decide to keep her. She becomes their daughter in many senses and they just love her to pieces. They name her Birdy but since that isn’t easy for her to pronounce, they change it to Beedy, as she cheeps out things like a bird, rather than speaking fully. Beedy is more bird-like than she is like a human and Warren and Tina struggle to protect her and keep her safe. Tina struggles a little more than Warren and tries to force Beedy into shoes that don’t fit comfortably, both literally and figuratively. So, off Beedy flies… to explore the world, just like a bird. Along the way she meets Lottie, a lonely little girl and a well-meaning fireman–emergency responder. Warren and Tina are very sad when she leaves so they set off to find her, breaking all their normal routines, all their comfort zones. Off they go to find their little Beedy. True to her nature, Beedy flies away from everyone but she also returns, a different kind of migration. All of them end up in Getovertel — get-over-tel— a hotel of sorts where people go to get over things, to get through their issues. And then… You can read the book to find out the rest but it will be worth it. This was really an unexpected treasure of a book for me. I love love love birds and this story just resonated with me. It is written with silliness included, quirky little sketches and digressions—a book after my own heart. Birds, quirkiness and digressions. What more could you want from a children’s book? Here are some random screenshots from...

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Curl up with a good book

Oct 18

Birds of a Feather: a book of idioms and silly pictures by Vanita Oelschlager is a delightful, colorful book filled with fun idioms (many bird related). Each idiom has a vibrant, silly illustration depicting the literal take on the sayings, such as “Bird of feather, flock together” and “Wild Good Chase”. My very favorite was “Ants in your pants” hahahahaha… hilarious illustration. In addition to the lovely illustrations, each idiom has an explanation what it means and an example sentence to give context to the meaning. I love it! I am a huge word-nerd and I love the idea of learning more idioms and their meanings. This is a fun book for all ages to read and to look...

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Travel me storied…

Feb 03

I happened upon some lovely book-related things… a picture and a poem. I am not certain who wrote the poem, I found it in a book but it says it was written anonymously (I found out who it was, see below). I will share them both with you. I hope you like them. The poem: I’ve travelled [sic] the world twice over, Met the famous; saints and sinners, Poets and artists, kings and queens, Old stars and hopeful beginners. I’ve been where no one’s been before, learned secrets from writers and cooks, All on one library ticket To the wonderful work of books. — Janice James (I found the author…with a little google...

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Moby Dick Snow Sculpture

Jan 16

This beautiful and creative snow sculpture was carved at the Winter Carnival in Québec City by Team Mexico (Horacio Castrejón Galván (captain), Luis Alberto Campomanes Martinez and Hermann Seedorf de Colombres). The team said the following about their sculpture, To carve snow is an occasion to tell a history, it is a space to say something. This time, the tale of Moby Dick serves as a pretext for the artists to create dynamic forms and to try to carry out an image full with life and...

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The Story of Forgetting by Stefan Merrill Block

Aug 08

I read a lot. Good books. Bad books. All sorts in between. Every now and again I come across a book so well-written, so engaging, so worth reading I find myself saddened at the mere thought of it ending even as I eagerly plow through the story. Today, I stumbled upon one of these books, The Story of Forgetting. I am simply awestruck by this debut novel written by Stefan Merrill Block. Not since Nicole Krauss’ The History of Love or Carlos Ruiz Zafón’s The Shadow of the Wind have I been this enamored with the way an author has told a compelling human story, a story so real we can all relate to it. Stefan Merrill Block has a way with words that entranced me, forcing the noisy, chaotic world to fall away and the fictitious world of silence to begin from the very first sentence, “I never found a way to fill all the silence.” This is introduction to a story about familial love, generational suffering and Alzheimer’s. A story I already want to read again. Two stories of love and loss—slow eroding loss, small undetectable death after subtle death after profound death within the same person—generation after generation. This is a story of deep, messy love. Family. Roots. Future and past. I am reticent to give away too much. I couldn’t possibly say it better than the author. I wouldn’t even try. “Once, I fell in love with everything…” (p.1) Once, I fell in love with everything an author wrote filling 310 pages with a story of a boy’s search for peace, for comfort with the agony of losing his mother to early onset Alzheimer’s, facing the frightening possibility that he will take after her, follow her in loss—of family, friends, memories, and self. The story of his struggle intersects with the story of a decrepit old man stuck slowly waiting his life away, refusing to forget, grasping on to his painfully beautiful memories–allowing them to be his hope against a weathered lonely reality in fast-changing surroundings. This is a story of remembering and forgetting and how fundamental both are to the human experience. This is story rooted in love and pain. Loss and redemption. A serious illness and how it affects families, friends, strangers. I dog-ear pages in the bottom corner...

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