Where The Sidewalk Ends: The Poems and Drawings of Shel Silverstein

Mar 03

Where The Sidewalk Ends: The Poems and Drawings of Shel Silverstein

For one of my 2013 Reading Challenges, Reading Outside the Box, I chose this category: It’s my Birthday! So, have a party! Read a book that was published in either your birth month or birth year! And for my birth year, 1974, one of my favorite authors Shel Silverstein published one of his most popular books, Where the Sidewalk Ends. So, I read it. It was a fun, silly book of poems. The poems are silly and catchy. Some of my favorites are: Sick, a poem about a little girl who swears she is sick with all sorts of ailments as she is trying to get out of going to school but in the end, it is Saturday! And she recovers very quickly indeed–silly girl; Hug O’ War, Because, I absolutely love hugs!; and, Spaghetti, Because it is silly and messy fun; and Lazy Jane, This book is definitely fun and I can see why it is so very popular! I would definitely recommend Where The Sidewalk Ends: The Poems and Drawings of Shel...

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Happy Birthday Dr. Seuss (2013)

Mar 01

Happy Birthday Dr. Seuss (2013)

March 2nd is Dr. Seuss’ 109th Birthday. And each year it is celebrated all over the United States through the Read Across America program. March 1, 2013 is NEA’s Read Across America Day. Straight from the National Education Association website, here is more about the Read Across America program, What is NEA’s Read Across America? NEA’s Read Across America is an annual reading motivation and awareness program that calls for every child in every community to celebrate reading on March 2, the birthday of beloved children’s author Dr. Seuss. NEA’s Read Across America also provides NEA members, parents, caregivers, and children the resources and activities they need to keep reading on the calendar 365 days a year. In cities and towns across the nation, teachers, teenagers, librarians, politicians, actors, athletes, parents, grandparents, and others develop NEA’s Read Across America activities to bring reading excitement to children of all ages. Governors, mayors, and other elected officials recognize the role reading plays in their communities with proclamations and floor statements. Athletes and actors issue reading challenges to young readers. And teachers and principals seem to be more than happy to dye their hair green or be duct-taped to a wall if it boosts their students’ reading. How and when did NEA’s Read Across America begin? In May 1997, a small reading task force at NEA came up with a big idea. “Let’s create a day to celebrate reading,” the group decided. “We hold pep rallies to get kids excited about football. We assemble to remember that Character Counts. Why don’t we do something to get kids excited about reading? We’ll call it ‘NEA’s Read Across America’ and we’ll celebrate it on Dr. Seuss’s birthday.” And so was born on March 2, 1998, the largest celebration of reading this country has ever seen. Why NEA’s Read Across America? Motivating children to read is an important factor in student achievement and creating lifelong successful readers. Research has shown that children who are motivated and spend more time reading do better in school. Who sponsors NEA’s Read Across America? At the national level, the National Education Association sponsors and spearheads the program with support from 40 national nonprofit and association partners. Locally, everyone—from schools...

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Read Across America Day 2013 is coming!

Feb 24

Read Across America Poem You’re never too old, too wacky, too wild, To pick up a book and read with a child. You’re never too busy, too cool, or too hot, To pick up a book and share what you’ve got. In schools and communities, Let’s gather around, Let’s pick up a book, Let’s pass it around. There are kids all around you, Kids who will need Someone to hug, Someone to read. Come join us March 1st Your own special way And make this America’s Read to Kids Day. All rights reserved by National Education Association for the photo and the...

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The Bird King by Shaun Tan

Feb 04

The Bird King by Shaun Tan I am a fan of Shaun Tan’s work. He creates these beautiful stories with no words, just pictures. They say more than words could say. So, when I saw his new book, The Bird King, I knew I had to read it. In this book he shares his sketches, his unfinished work, his unpublished work–he shares pieces of his sketchbook and thought processes. I think the following quote from the author sums it up, One of the joys of drawing is that meaning can be constantly postponed, and there is no real pressure to “say” anything special when working privately in a sketchbook. This book lefts so much unsaid. It leaves us to feel, think and find our own version of the story beginning (or ending). These are some of my favorite sketches, they really moved me for various reasons: This last one is my favorite. I think so much of it tells a story I am familiar with intimately. I love it. This book is well worth the...

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Bout of Books!

Jan 07

  The Bout of Books read-a-thon is organized by Amanda @ On a Book Bender and Kelly @ Reading the Paranormal. It is a week long read-a-thon that begins 12:01am Monday, January 7th and runs through Sunday, January 13th in whatever time zone you are in. Bout of Books is low-pressure, and the only reading competition is between you and your usual number of books read in a week. There are challenges, giveaways, and a grand prize, but all of these are completely optional. For all Bout of Books 6.0 information and updates, be sure to visit the Bout of Books blog. – From the Bout of Books 6.0 team I am joining in the fun this week! I could use the quiet time. =) I will commit to read more than I have been lately....

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2013 Reading Challenges

Jan 03

I want to try some new stuff, reattempt some I didn’t tackle last year and just enjoy reading. This year, I am joining even more reading challenges! However, I might join at lower levels. Instead of ‘Go big or go home”, I am choosing to “go small and stay home. 🙂 A little of the old,   Definition of a chunkster: A chunkster is 450 pages or more of ADULT literature, whether non-fiction or fiction. A chunkster should be a challenge. Level: The Chubby Chunkster – this option is for the readers who want to dabble in large tomes, but really doesn’t want to commit to much more than that. FOUR Chunksters is all you need to finish this challenge. 1. Harlem Renaissance : five novels of the 1920s edited by Rafia Zafar (Review) 2. 11/22/63 by Stephen King (849 pages) 3. The Angel’s Game by Carlos Ruiz Zafón (672 pages) 4. _____________________________________________________ ** ** A little of the new… ** ** _____________________________________________________   Rules: Read x amount of books, one in each category you choose. Books cannot be re-read, except category 9. Each month post about your experience reading and link back. You can overlap categories. Level: It’s not so bad out here!:  5-7 categories 1.  It’s my Birthday! So, have a party! Read a book that was published in either your birth month or birth year! Where the Sidewalk Ends: The Poems and Drawings of Shel Silverstein (Review) 2.  It’s All About ME! Read a memoir. (True Compass or Tis’ or Angela’s Ashes or Teacher Man by Frank McCourt) 3. Visit an Old Friend Read a favorite again. 4. I couldn’t help myself! Grab a book by it’s cover—cover love. 5. To be or Not to be… Read a play, memorize a poem and analyze it since it’s rolling around in your head! 6. XyZ pdQ Grab a book that has either an X, Z or Q in the title! Or in the author’s name. (Quiet by Susan Cain or The Lost City of X by David Grann) _____________________________________________________   The only rules are to read x-amount of books over 650 pages and enjoy tea while you do it. =) A C.S. Lewis inspired challenge. I like it. I...

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