Curses For Sale: Ravens Pass by Steve Brezenoff

Mar 08

Curses For Sale: Ravens Pass by Steve Brezenoff

Curses For Sale (Ravens Pass) by Steven Brezenoff is a fun, easy read for young adults and older children. For me, it was reminiscent of the Goosebump series of my childhood. Scary danger just around the corner but the main characters usually do the right thing, even if it means having to face their fears or let go of something I want. This story follows that pattern–it is one in a series of four books, I believe, though I haven’t read any of the other books yet. I definitely will. You can read them all or you can read just one, you will enjoy the experience, at least with Curses For Sale, you will! This is the story of Jace who loves cars. He gets a little red toy car from a garage sale and it takes on a life of its own. Things start to “happen” and he soon, he and his best friend decide they must know where the car came from and how it became so extraordinary. And an adventure they have… I won’t spoil the fun but rather encourage you to pick up Curses For Sale (Ravens Pass) and I will get the other three in the series and see what else happens… at Raven’s Pass. =) *I received a free e-copy from Netgalley in exchange for a review of this...

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Skinny Dipping in Daylight by Cory Basil

Mar 08

Skinny Dipping in Daylight by Cory Basil

Skinny Dipping in Daylight by Cory Basil is a book of poetry and prose, words dancing from one to the next, in a melodic sort of way. Cory Basil is as talented with his words as he is with his art. I do not want to give too much away but if I had to choose a favorite poem, it would be The Searcher. It is a poem of struggle to find out who you are and trying to answer the question what is the meaning of life? In a way, it is written in a stunted sort of way, like each line drops off like a cliff of sorts, which lends to the emotional fear, the unknowing, we all face day to day in life, with the big questions, anyways. Read the book to find out why I loved it, and then come back, we can discuss it. You can also visit the author’s site...

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Eep!

Mar 08

Eep!

      Eep! by Joke van Leeuwen is really one of the best children’s books I’ve read in a long time. It started out with 3 words that just grabbed me, Warren likes birds. He is married to Tina. They seem to live a rather ordinary life, filled with repetition, doing the same old-same old, like most of us. We get into our habits, our comfortable routines. They have as well. Until one day Warren sees a new kind of baby bird, a part human bird. He brings her home and it is love at first site—they decide to keep her. She becomes their daughter in many senses and they just love her to pieces. They name her Birdy but since that isn’t easy for her to pronounce, they change it to Beedy, as she cheeps out things like a bird, rather than speaking fully. Beedy is more bird-like than she is like a human and Warren and Tina struggle to protect her and keep her safe. Tina struggles a little more than Warren and tries to force Beedy into shoes that don’t fit comfortably, both literally and figuratively. So, off Beedy flies… to explore the world, just like a bird. Along the way she meets Lottie, a lonely little girl and a well-meaning fireman–emergency responder. Warren and Tina are very sad when she leaves so they set off to find her, breaking all their normal routines, all their comfort zones. Off they go to find their little Beedy. True to her nature, Beedy flies away from everyone but she also returns, a different kind of migration. All of them end up in Getovertel — get-over-tel— a hotel of sorts where people go to get over things, to get through their issues. And then… You can read the book to find out the rest but it will be worth it. This was really an unexpected treasure of a book for me. I love love love birds and this story just resonated with me. It is written with silliness included, quirky little sketches and digressions—a book after my own heart. Birds, quirkiness and digressions. What more could you want from a children’s book? Here are some random screenshots from...

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Where The Sidewalk Ends: The Poems and Drawings of Shel Silverstein

Mar 03

Where The Sidewalk Ends: The Poems and Drawings of Shel Silverstein

For one of my 2013 Reading Challenges, Reading Outside the Box, I chose this category: It’s my Birthday! So, have a party! Read a book that was published in either your birth month or birth year! And for my birth year, 1974, one of my favorite authors Shel Silverstein published one of his most popular books, Where the Sidewalk Ends. So, I read it. It was a fun, silly book of poems. The poems are silly and catchy. Some of my favorites are: Sick, a poem about a little girl who swears she is sick with all sorts of ailments as she is trying to get out of going to school but in the end, it is Saturday! And she recovers very quickly indeed–silly girl; Hug O’ War, Because, I absolutely love hugs!; and, Spaghetti, Because it is silly and messy fun; and Lazy Jane, This book is definitely fun and I can see why it is so very popular! I would definitely recommend Where The Sidewalk Ends: The Poems and Drawings of Shel...

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Love Medicine by Louise Erdrich

Mar 02

Love Medicine by Louise Erdrich

Love Medicine was a really good book. It is Native American literature and it is filled with disjointed short stories, coming together, as a tribe would from all angles. The characters are strong and vulnerable, believable and the stories pull on your heart strings. This is a book with a message. In this book we read about two families spanning many decades, in a non-linear manner. This lends to the interconnectedness of the past, the present and the future. That is a main point, each generation affects the next and the last. And many more to come. This book tells of the Governmental “re-education” of the Native Americans by predominantly white people and religious organizations. It tells of subjugation, of the woes of reservation, of alcohol and stereotypes. It tells of the struggle to cope with forced assimilation while still trying to hold on to who you are, the culture you have always known and that of your ancestors—while not being given the option to stay the same. I do not want to give too much away but I would definitely recommend Love...

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Axis Mundi by Karen Holmberg

Feb 25

Axis Mundi by Karen Holmberg

I love poetry and I love birds. So, when I saw this book with a bird on the cover, titled Axis Mundi, or the center of the world—the connection between Heaven and Earth, between man and woman, the cosmic axis—I thought to myself, this is a book I need to read. Axis Mundi was written by a poet, Karen Holmberg, who happens to be from Oregon, another lovely part of the Pacific Northwest. She writes of powerful things in her poetry, evoking strong emotions and visceral reactions in some. …by the mother who gives to us, and gives to us, Then wrenches away what we love In her vast wave. (Ward, 17-18) I can feel it being wrenched away, that which I love, whatever that is to me. Karen plays with language like an architect plays with lines and creates something beautiful, an emotion jumping off the paper through my eyes into my mind, burrowing for days so I might keep thinking about the meaning of her words, her poems, this book. She also writes her poetry with varying structure. Some were concrete poems which mix visual form and text to make a statement, staggering lines in some of her poems like, Negative (45-48). This adds a sense of dramatic effect, allowing the reader to fall off long-awaited cliffs or abruptly, like the emotion, or experience. It helps the readers experience the poem, rather than just read it. If you like poetry, you will like this book. I definitely recommend...

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