Where The Sidewalk Ends: The Poems and Drawings of Shel Silverstein

Mar 03

Where The Sidewalk Ends: The Poems and Drawings of Shel Silverstein

For one of my 2013 Reading Challenges, Reading Outside the Box, I chose this category: It’s my Birthday! So, have a party! Read a book that was published in either your birth month or birth year! And for my birth year, 1974, one of my favorite authors Shel Silverstein published one of his most popular books, Where the Sidewalk Ends. So, I read it. It was a fun, silly book of poems. The poems are silly and catchy. Some of my favorites are: Sick, a poem about a little girl who swears she is sick with all sorts of ailments as she is trying to get out of going to school but in the end, it is Saturday! And she recovers very quickly indeed–silly girl; Hug O’ War, Because, I absolutely love hugs!; and, Spaghetti, Because it is silly and messy fun; and Lazy Jane, This book is definitely fun and I can see why it is so very popular! I would definitely recommend Where The Sidewalk Ends: The Poems and Drawings of Shel...

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I Wrote This For You by Pleasefindthis

May 18

I came across a website, I Wrote This For You dot me, and found the writing of this person enamoring. He had published a book of various posts he had written over the years illustrated with photographs taken by his partner,  Jon Ellis. Naturally, I bought the book, I Wrote This For You straight away. I actually read the entire book aloud to a friend the night I bought it. We finished within an hour and a half and it was definitely worth the read. We stopped and discussed many of the passages, as well. The author has lovely insight into human frailty, pain, suffering and love. His words touch some part of us that are wounded, that may never heal. He writes to and for all of us. Telling us things we all need to hear every now and again. Reminding us it is OK to be gentle and open, to love without fear or love despite fear. A few passages stood out for me. I bookmarked a lot of pages. But one really resonated because it reflects how I feel lately. It is titled, “The Bleach”: You are your hair and your eyes and your thoughts. You are what you look at and what you feel and what you do about it. The light from the sun is still a part of the sun. My thoughts of you are as real any part of you. This book is filled with lovely snippets of human emotion. Bravo to the author willing to share and lay his soul bare for the whole world to read and I hope it was as well-received by others as it was by me. You can get this book here.   This book was part of my reading challenge — the 2012 Eclectic Reader Challenge — under my favorite genre:...

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More Book Poems from the 1900’s

Mar 22

I loved these poems so much, I wanted to share more. Ode to Forgotten Authors What though your humble names are never heard In these ungracious days, Yet by your words were many bosoms stirred What time you piped your lays! Then, your quaint prose or long-forgotten verse Some student, it might be, Would to his comrades lovingly rehearse, So long ago, ah, me! Among you may be some who in their time Swayed many a heart, I trow; Not to have read you almost seemed a crime To those who prized you so! Your names were once upon the lips of men, Your volumes by their side; They praised those prosings of your fluent pen We “moderns” should deride! And others of you who in numbers chose To ease their teeming brain, For some had all the sweetness of the rose, The music of the rain. Your books were read by many a crystal rill, In sweet Julys long dead, Or gladly conned when winter nights were chill, And cheery fires burnt red. And now your works are overlaid with dust, They share oblivion’s night; Till in the same box some hand by chance is thrust, And drags one to the light! The page for centuries closed we turn once more Then, smiling, go our way, Harder to please than in the days of yore— Well, well, you had your day.1   Old Friends, Old Books Old friends, old books are surely best, Already long they’ve stood the test, In times of stress or indolence Have ministered to soul and sense, With grace responsive to each quest. Aye, every whim by us possest When winds blow east or winds blow west, They kindly humor—not incense— Old friends, old books! The new may touch with keener zest When we with ennui are opprest But only briefly; turning thence, With reawakened confidence, We seek—for peace, for joy, for rest— Old friends, old books!2   Ere Lamplight Dawneth When do I love you most, sweet books of mine? In strenuous morns when o’er your leaves I pore, Austerely bent to win austerest lore, Forgetting how the dewy meadows shine; Or afternoons when honeysuckles twine About the seat, and to some dreary...

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1900’s Book Poems

Mar 21

I came across some book poems from the early 1900’s. This one is short and sweet, and would actually make a good sign or whatnot… This book’s one thing, My foot’s another; Touch not the one For fear of the other.1 And this one is rather clever. The man is clearly less impressed with his wife’s preoccupation with reading. He’d rather her be doing something a bit more domestic, as you will read, My Love in book lore’s very wise, She cons the ancient classics o’er, And talks of the “Immortal Four”— But never talks of making pies. She raves of Spenser’s “Fairy Queen,” And Chaucer’s “Canterbury Tales;” Says modern verse beside them pales— But mentions not the rare baked bean. Euripides and Socrates, Ovid and Homer, all, she quotes; Is busy with her, “Browning notes”— But not a note on biscuits sees. Of books I know not overmuch, But oft I with my darling plead, And beg that she will sometimes read Some books I value—they are such Juliet Corson’s “Cooking School,” “Buckeye Cook Book,” “How to Live” On half enough a week, and give Three square meals daily, cooked to rule. I cannot rave of Sappho’s wit, But Miss Parloa well I know, And Marion Harland’s worth can show, And Mrs. Lincoln quote a bit. Their works are equal, I maintain, To all the best of ancient books, For men are civilized by cooks, More than by Learning’s gentle reign. Success is work, and hungry men Few battles win or poems write; The well-fed mortal wins the fight In this old world, with sword or pen.2 And a poem that clearly demonstrates a bibliophile… O silent volumes on my shelves, That hold the deathless and divine, Ye have but to reveal yourselves, And I am yours, as ye are mine! Mere ink and paper though ye be, As shells wherein no life appears— If hand but touched and eye but see, Then mind meets mind across the years. Dante and Shakespeare speak once more, Beethoven sings his soulful strain; And in the unsealed tombs of yore Wake all the passion, all the pain. They are not dead, these silent ones, Nor dumb, but eloquent with light, And...

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Travel me storied…

Feb 03

I happened upon some lovely book-related things… a picture and a poem. I am not certain who wrote the poem, I found it in a book but it says it was written anonymously (I found out who it was, see below). I will share them both with you. I hope you like them. The poem: I’ve travelled [sic] the world twice over, Met the famous; saints and sinners, Poets and artists, kings and queens, Old stars and hopeful beginners. I’ve been where no one’s been before, learned secrets from writers and cooks, All on one library ticket To the wonderful work of books. — Janice James (I found the author…with a little google...

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More Irish literature…

Mar 20

In honor of Irish-American Heritage Month (March) I am trying to reading as much Irish literature as I can. I wanted to start with a history of Ireland but not dry statistical information that will go in one eye and out the other. I wanted the story of Ireland and decided to do some searching. From what I found on many websites and reading pages the book most recommended was Frank Delaney’s “Ireland”. And so, without hesitation I picked it up and WOW! I mowed through the first 170 pages in one day… it is amazing! This man can tell a story. He writes wonderfully and the story is engaging in a way I miss. Too many books lack a good story, too many authors lack that magic with words but Frank Delaney does not! I will keep you up to date on my thoughts about this book when I finish reading it but for now I recommend you stop reading this and go to the bookstore or go to your favorite website and order it… get it on a Nook, get it on a Kindle, get it on audiobook, get it at the store, get it anywhere! Get it today. It is realllllllllly good so far! I also chose two other Irish books. I will post a thorough review of each as I finish them. Irish Americans: A History by Jay P. Dolan Ireland’s Pirate Queen: The True Story of Grace O’Malley, 1530-1603 by Anne...

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